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Posts for tag: pediatric dentistry

5ThingstoGetYourChildsOralHealthontheRightTrack

Boosting your child's oral health and development should start early—even before their first tooth comes in! Getting off to the right start will pay dividends well into their adult years.

Here are 5 things to do, then, to help your child develop great oral health during their earliest years.

Begin oral hygiene early. To lower your child's risk of tooth decay, begin wiping out their mouth with a clean cloth after nursing to limit bacteria. When teeth do come in, gently brush them with just a dab of toothpaste, which you can gradually increase to a pea-size when they get older. Later, add flossing as well as training them to brush and floss for themselves.

Avoid too much sugar. Carbohydrates like refined sugar feed bacteria that cause tooth decay. To reduce these bacteria, moderate your child's sugar consumption by limiting sweets to meal times and cutting back on sodas, juices, and other types of sweetened drinks. Avoid bedtime bottles filled with these types of beverages including breast milk or formula.

Visit the dentist by age 1. Starting dental visits on or before your child's first birthday will help you stay one step ahead of any developing dental problems. Furthermore, children who get in the routine early for regular dental visits have a better time adjusting to them, and they're less likely to develop long-term anxiety over seeing the dentist.

Take advantage of fluoride. Tiny amounts of fluoride ingestion can give your child an edge over tooth decay. To take advantage of fluoride, use fluoride toothpaste and fluoridated water, if your utility adds it. Your dentist can also directly apply fluoride to children's teeth high risk for decay. Be careful, though, because too much fluoride can cause staining. Talk with your dentist, then, about staying within fluoride limits.

Set the example. Children often follow their parents' lead—if you take your own dental care seriously, they will too. Make daily hygiene a family affair by brushing and flossing together. Let them also see that going to the dentist is a snap. By staying calm and relaxed yourself, they'll be less likely to be nervous about dental care.

If you would like more information on dental care for children, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Top 10 Oral Health Tips for Children.”

4ThingsYouCanDotoKeepYourChildrensDentalDevelopmentonTrack

After spending much time and expense to keep your kids healthy, you're probably well-acquainted with your family physician. Similarly, you should be just as chummy with your family dentist: That's because your children's oral health is closely linked to their overall health and well-being.

Of course, good oral health is important for everyone, regardless of age. But it's doubly true for children for one additional reason—they're teeth, gums and jaws are still growing. Current problems like tooth decay or an abnormal bite can affect a child's oral development in ways that could reverberate through the rest of their life.

It's important, then, for you to stay ahead of any potential oral problems that could follow them into adulthood. In recognition of National Children's Dental Health Month in February, here are 4 things you can do to keep your child's dental health and development on track.

Practice oral hygiene. One of the best things we can all do to prevent dental disease is to brush and floss every day. It's equally important for children—helping (and later teaching) them to brush and floss reduces their chances for tooth decay. You should even begin before they have teeth, wiping out an infant's mouth with a clean, damp cloth after nursing to reduce bacterial growth in the mouth.

Schedule early dental visits. In addition to daily oral hygiene, regular dental cleanings and checkups also help prevent dental disease. You should schedule your child's first dental visit on or before their first birthday to give you a head start in preventing or treating tooth decay. Children who begin dental visits early are also less likely to develop dental anxiety.

Obtain further decay protection. Even if parents do everything right, some children are simply more susceptible to tooth decay. But we have a number of treatments that can help prevent the disease. Sealants, for example, fill in the nooks and crannies of biting surfaces to prevent plaque buildup. And, topical fluoride applications help strengthen tooth enamel against bacterial acid attack.

Get their bite evaluated. There's no need to wait until childhood's end to address a bite problem. A poor bite doesn't develop overnight, and often provides signs in a child's early years. That's why it's a good idea to have an orthodontist evaluate your child's bite around age 6. If they find an emerging bite problem, they may be able to intervene now, so you can avoid extensive—and expensive—treatment later.

You have a long list of priorities to keep up with in protecting your kids' health and well-being. Be sure one of those priorities high on the list is their oral health.

If you would like more information about children's dental care, please contact us or schedule a consultation. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine article “Top 10 Oral Health Tips for Children.”

AMinorProcedureCouldHelpanInfantWithThisNursingProblem

Newborns come into the world eager and ready to partake of their mother's milk. But an anatomical quirk with some infants could make breastfeeding more difficult for them.

The structure in question is a frenum, a tiny band of tissue connecting softer parts of the mouth with firmer parts, like the upper lip to the gums, and the tongue to the floor of the mouth. If they're abnormally short, thick or tight, however, the baby might find it difficult to obtain a good seal around the mother's nipple.

Without that seal, the baby has a difficult time drawing milk out of the breast and as a result, they may attempt to compensate by chewing on the nipple. The sad outcome is often continuing hunger and frustration for the baby, and pain for the mother.

To alleviate this problem, a physician can clip the frenum to loosen it. Known as a frenotomy, (or a frenectomy or frenuplasty, depending on the exact actions taken), it's a minor procedure a doctor can perform in their office.

It begins with the doctor deadening the area with a numbing gel or injected anesthesia. After a few minutes to allow the anesthesia to take effect, they clip the frenum with surgical scissors or with a laser (there's usually little to no bleeding with the latter).

Once the frenum has been clipped, the baby should be able to nurse right away. However, they may have a learning curve to using the now freed-up parts of their mouth to obtain a solid seal while nursing.

Abnormal frenums that interfere with nursing are usually treated as soon as possible. But even if it isn't impeding breastfeeding, an abnormal frenum could eventually interfere with other functions like speech development, or it could foster the development of a gap between the front teeth. It may be necessary, then, to revisit the frenum at an older age and treat it at that time.

Although technically a surgical procedure, frenotomies are minor and safe to perform on newborns. Their outcome, though, can be transformative, allowing a newborn to gain the full nourishment and emotional bonding they need while breastfeeding.

If you would like more information on tongue or lip ties, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Tongue Ties, Lip Ties and Breastfeeding.”

HeresWhatToDoIfYourChildComplainsofaToothache

Perhaps the only thing worse than having a toothache of your own is when your child has one. Tooth pain can be a miserable experience, especially for children. It can also be confusing about what to do to deal with it.

Fortunately, a toothache usually isn't a dental emergency, so take a deep breath. Here's what you should do if your child is experiencing tooth pain.

Get the 411 from them. Before you call the dentist, find out more first about the tooth pain from your child with a few probing questions: Where exactly does it hurt? Do you feel it all through your mouth or just in one place? Is it all the time, or just when you bite down? When did it start? You may not get the same level of detail as you would from an adult, but even a little information helps.

Take a look in their mouth. There are a lot of causes for toothache like a decayed tooth or abscessed gums. See if any of the teeth look abnormal or if the gums are swollen. You might also find a piece of food or other particle wedged between the teeth causing the pain. In that case, a little dental floss might relieve the problem.

Ease the pain. While you're waiting on your dental appointment, you can help relieve some of their discomfort by giving them a child-appropriate dose of ibuprofen or acetaminophen. You can also apply an ice pack on the outside of the jaw for five minutes on, then five minutes off to decrease swelling. Under no circumstances, however, should you give your child aspirin or rub it on the gums.

See the dentist. It's always a good idea to follow up with the dentist, even if the pain subsides. In most cases, you may be able to wait until the next day. There are, however, circumstances that call for a visit as soon as possible: if the child is running a fever and/or has facial swelling; or if the tooth pain seems to be related to an injury or trauma.

It can be unsettling as a parent when your child has a toothache. But knowing what to do can help you stay calm and get them the care they need.

If you would like more information on pediatric dental care, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “A Child's Toothache.”

HowtoEnsureYourChildsTeethandGumsStayHealthyNowandLater

Being a parent can be a rewarding role. But it's also hard work, especially the effort required in keeping children healthy. In that respect, there's one area you don't want to overlook—their dental health.

Taking care of their teeth and gums has two aspects: their current state of dental health and their ongoing development that impacts future health. Fortunately, you can address both the present and the future by focusing on the following areas.

Prioritizing oral hygiene. From the moment your child is born, you'll want to practice daily oral hygiene to keep their teeth and gums clean of disease-causing bacterial plaque. This starts even before teeth erupt—simply wipe their gums with a clean wet cloth after feeding. As teeth emerge, begin brushing each one with a small amount of toothpaste. Around your child's second birthday, start training them to brush and floss on their own.

Limit their sugar intake. The biggest threat to your child's teeth is tooth decay, which is caused by bacteria. These bacteria multiply when they have plenty of sugar available in the mouth, one of their primary food sources. It's important then to reduce the sugar they eat and limit it to mealtimes if possible. Also avoid sending them to bed with a bottle filled with sweetened liquids, including juices and even formula.

Visit the dentist. You're not in this alone—your dentist is your partner for keeping your child's teeth healthy and developing properly. So, begin regular visits when your child's first teeth appear (no later than their first birthday). You should also consider having your child undergo an orthodontic evaluation around age 6 to make sure their bite is developing properly.

Practice oral safety. Over half the dental injuries in children under 7 occur in home settings around furniture. As your child is learning to walk, be aware of things in your home environment like tables and chairs, or hard objects they can place in their mouths. Take action then to move these items or restrict your child's access to them.

Good habits in each of these areas can make it easier to keep your child's teeth and gums healthy and on the right development track. That means good dental health today that could carry on into adulthood.

If you would like more information on children's dental care, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Top 10 Oral Health Tips For Children.”



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